Kasabian's Crazy end to Glastonbury

Dolly Parton was given an award backstage at Glastonbury Festival

Tom Meighan of Kasabian performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival

Dolly Parton was on top form at Glastonbury

First published in National Entertainment News © by

The sun went down on Glastonbury 2014 as Kasabian headlined the Pyramid Stage following a day which saw country queen Dolly Parton attract the biggest crowd of the festival.

Leicester rockers Kasabian put on an energetic show that saw them perform a selection of their anthemic hits including Club Foot, Shoot The Runner and Processed Beats.

The huge crowd also sang along to their cover of Gnarls Barkley's Crazy as they enjoyed some of the last moments of the festival.

A 100,000-plus audience flocked to see Dolly earlier, as she sang hits including Jolene and Blue Smoke, while many paid homage by dressing up as the star.

But although she went down a storm with those watching, many viewing her set as it was broadcast on TV questioned whether the singer was miming.

A spokesman for the star rubbished the claims, saying: "No, she sings live.

"Some people don't know an amazing singer when they hear one."

As promised, Dolly appeared in white, dressed in a rhinestone-encrusted waistcoat and matching trousers, after saying previously that the colour went well with the brown mud.

Dolly told the adoring crowd it was "such an honour and such a thrill to be here at Glastonbury Festival".

She added: "I've been waiting a lifetime for this and of course we want all of you to have the best time."

The 68-year-old has been the most talked about act of the festival, with excitement building ahead of her taking to the Pyramid Stage for what has become know as the Sunday Afternoon Legend's Slot following other artists including Ray Davies, Shirley Bassey and James Brown.

Dolly, who said she had composed a special "mud" song in honour for her trip to Glastonbury, was also joined on stage by Bon Jovi guitarist Richie Sambora for Lay Your Hands On Me.

The crowd stretched back in all directions with all the walkways leading to the stage full and many complaining they had no chance of seeing the diminutive star.

But as she began the classic Nine To Five they erupted into cheers, singing along and dancing on the spot.

Earlier, Dolly told a press conference backstage that she had planned to play some of her more upbeat tracks from her extensive back catalogue.

"I can't do a bunch of sad songs because everyone is drunk and high," she said.

Describing Glastonbury as the "biggest festival in the world", she added: "I thought I had to write a song about the Glastonbury mud, even though the sun's shining today."

She said the conditions underfoot made her feel at home as she grew up in Tennessee on a farm.

"I'm just a country girl and now I feel like a rock star," she added.

The singer was speaking as she was presented with an award backstage at the festival in recognition of her having sold 100 million records worldwide.

Earlier festival organiser Michael Eavis said he - like most people on site - was excited about seeing the country queen perform.

"I'm really looking forward to hearing some of her songs live for the first time in my life," he said.

Kasabian followed Arcade Fire and Metallica as headliners, while Bombay Bicycle Club, Massive Attack and Ellie Goulding also performed across other stages.

The last day of official acts saw the rain that had been forecast fail to materialise, with revellers enjoying mainly sunshine all day.

Once all festival-goers have left the Somerset site on Monday the big clean-up begins, with hundreds of volunteers and workers involved.

It will take up to six weeks to restore Worthy Farm to its normal state.

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