Oliver Valves boss Michael Oliver awarded OBE in Queen's birthday honours list

Michael Oliver, with Fred Dibnah’s steam engine, has been made an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List. n103273

Michael Oliver, with Fred Dibnah’s steam engine, has been made an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List. n103273

First published in News Knutsford Guardian: Photograph of the Author by , News Editor

A KNUTSFORD businessman has been recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

Michael Oliver, the chairman and founder of Oliver Valves, the Cheshire-based manufacturer of valves used by the world’s biggest energy companies, has been awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to the valve industry.

Having launched Oliver Valves in 1979 with a single product – an innovative valve of his design – he has grown it into a group of three businesses with combined profits of more than £15 million supplying energy projects right around the globe.

Michael told the Guardian he wanted to thank the whole company for the support it had shown.

He said: “I am deeply honoured to be recognised in this way by the Queen, and I would like to thank all of the hard-working employees at Oliver Valves as well as my family, without whose dedication and support this success would not have been possible.”

The news follows the recent selection of Oliver Valvetek– one of three companies in the Oliver Valves family – for a Queen’s Award for Enterprise, the most prestigious corporate award any UK business can win.

As well as being an outspoken proponent of British manufacturing and engineering, Michael is also known for his philanthropic work, supporting a range of charities locally, nationally and internationally, including the Armed Forces Benevolent Fund, the NSPCC, Wood Street Mission and Variety Club.

He recently established the Michael Oliver Foundation, which supports carers living in the Cheshire area.

Former Cheshire Police chief constable, Peter Fahy, was awarded a knighthood in the same list.

The current Greater Manchester Police chief constable said the honour should be shared with his officers and staff.

“You can’t give a knighthood to a whole police force, so it has been given to me as leader of such a hard-working organisation,” he said.

“My parents came to this country as very poor Irish immigrants in the late 50s. The fact that in one generation I can get to this position says a lot about why this is such a great country.”

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