New conservation at Tatton Park set to provide informative walk for visitors

Knutsford Guardian: Beech Avenue in Tatton Park Beech Avenue in Tatton Park

VISITORS to Tatton Park will be able to enjoy a new walking experience following the creation of a conservation area.

The Beech Avenue Conservation Trial is 2 kilometres long and takes approximately 45 minutes to complete. 

The trail was created following conservation work to protect the veteran tree habitat of Beech Avenue, which was planted in 1739. 

Along the way walkers will be able to learn about the history, wildlife and landscape features of the avenue and the surrounding areas through a number of interpretation panels, from the bats and insects that inhabit the area, to the ice house and tank bridges that can be seen along the route.

Park manager Phil Lucas said: “Visitors are set to enjoy a new parkland experience whilst at the same time helping conserve Tatton’s valuable and unique landscape so future generations can enjoy the same.”
 

Comments (1)

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6:09pm Sun 15 Jun 14

Rob Alves says...

How is putting an exclusion zone round the Beech avenue an enhancement? I would be more convinced of Tatton's interest in ecology if they weren't actively supporting the decimation of biodiversity in ancient woodland at the Bewilderwood development. The common factor is an attempt to balance the books and avoid the cost of managing the woodland properly. Surely it would be better to sell the suitable wood from the fallen trees for firewood and chip the rest to put down on the compacted paths to protect the tree roots and generate new soil. Then we and future generations can continue to enjoy the avenue as I am sure Lord Egerton intended.
How is putting an exclusion zone round the Beech avenue an enhancement? I would be more convinced of Tatton's interest in ecology if they weren't actively supporting the decimation of biodiversity in ancient woodland at the Bewilderwood development. The common factor is an attempt to balance the books and avoid the cost of managing the woodland properly. Surely it would be better to sell the suitable wood from the fallen trees for firewood and chip the rest to put down on the compacted paths to protect the tree roots and generate new soil. Then we and future generations can continue to enjoy the avenue as I am sure Lord Egerton intended. Rob Alves
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